What’s the Best Way to Handle a Generic Message That Your Mailbox is Almost Full?

About one year ago, when I worked for an insurance company, I received an email message that my Outlook mailbox was almost full — Delete any items you don’t need from your Mailbox and empty your Deleted Items folder. I was at 98% capacity – the corporate exchange server only allots each client 100 MB of Inbox storage. It was the first time I had seen that message so I emptied my Deleted folder and went about my business.

One day later, the same message Delete any items you don’t need from your Mailbox and empty your Deleted Items folder. No other message or guidelines appeared. 

Image from active-office-portal.co.uk

Help, I cried. Why wasn’t there a tip sheet, especially to those who are not familiar with this message? The tip sheet could have mentioned any created folders needed to be outside the Inbox and not on the server itself. The tip sheet could have also mentioned that some of the biggest culprits of disk space usage are larger files attached to emails. Emails with files in your Sent folder or currently in your Inbox. You could always save the email, but delete or move associated files to free up significant space.

In addition, the message Delete any items you don’t need from your Mailbox and empty your Deleted Items folder does not tell me how to review my Inbox size once I delete files so I’d have a better idea how much disk space I made available and how to gauge how much progress I’ve made. This would help me know what else, if anything, I still needed to do.

I did find some irony with addressing this issue. I didn’t have to delete any emails or empty my Deleted folder. Surprising, my Sent folder contained about 70% of the total Inbox capacity, once I move those emails (and file attachments) to my Personal Folder, I was free of this message. No more Delete any items you don’t need from your Mailbox and empty your Deleted Items folder for a long time.

Mind you, it’s not a bad message – but the author could have been more specific — to enable the user to know how best address this issue. In other words, being more customer centric. Who knows, providing more details and a better explanation may have provided cost savings by generating fewer help desk calls and may have been considered Empathica Service.

 

Kevin Schwarm

I have over 25 years of professional experience in business, information technology (IT), and customer service. Industry experience in retail, medical insurance, higher education, non-profit, financial services, and property and casualty insurance. Customer focused professional interested in providing value (save time, money and aggravation) by evaluating and analyzing information, services and products with a unique perspective.

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